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7 Tips for Laser Engraving Rubber Stamps

Stamp engraving is a common application for laser machines. Lasers are utilized to engrave soft rubber to produce fine words and figures. The engraved rubber, once cleaned up, is adhered to a handle, and a unique product is produced. Rubber stamps like this are customized commercial products that are frequently asked for from clients.

Keep these seven tips in mind when engraving stamps, and you’ll achieve an elegant appearance.

1. Check “Invert” in the printer driver to make sure the stamped result meets your needs.

Pro tip: For the laser machine, black means a laser-firing area, and white means not a laser-firing area.

2. Check “Mirror” in the printer driver to make sure the stamped orientation is correct.

Pro tip: ”Invert” and “Mirror” can also be activated in graphic design software (Illustrator, CorelDRAW, Photoshop, etc.) if the printer driver of the laser machine does not support it.

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3. Set the shoulder level in the printer driver. A good shoulder level can hold and strengthen the stamp structure, which provides a perfect stamped result.

4. Check “Air” in the printer driver. This keeps the rubber from overheating during the laser processing and dusts off the focal lens.

5. Set a correct engraving parameter to make sure the engraved depth is more than half of the thickness of the rubber to avoid ink stain on the engraved part and residues on paper.

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Ensure the engraved depth is more than half of the thickness of the rubber.

6. Set a correct engraving direction according to the position of the fume extraction system to get the best suction effect.

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Set a correct engraving direction according to the position of the fume extraction system.

7. A toothbrush is the best tool for cleaning the stamp. Adding some dishwashing liquid can help to clean the dust off easily.

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Washing with water vs. washing with water and dish liquid.
Devin Huang

Devin Huang

Devin Huang is the deputy manager of the laser product line from GCC and an application engineer that handles the GCC LaserPro Application Lab. He releases laser product showcases and application sharing at www.gccworld.com.

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