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Managing Fonts in CorelDraw X8

Discover the font-friendly features of the staple software.

One of the biggest time-wasters happens when artwork comes in that includes a mystery font. Often it can be found among your own collections-that alone could mean scrolling through hundreds if not thousands of fonts. Sometimes you can’t find it at all and need to turn to the internet for help. Corel has done two things in CorelDraw X8 that, among many other font-related improvements, can help address the mystery font issue.

First, they’ve incorporated a font identification service called What the Font into CorelDraw. You supply a sample of the font, and using various criteria, the program tries to find a match including consulting online with some volunteer font gurus.

Finding a font on your hard drive or other storage devices has been made easier by the addition of Corel Font Manager. Among other things, it can search by characteristics or font style such as serif or sans serif, script, etc., and also show the font options using the same text as in the font sample supplied. If you receive the headline “Dog Shampoo” in a font you can’t recognize, in Font Manager, you can set up the search to display the words “Dog Shampoo” so you can compare those words displayed in any font. With Font Manager, that search can be done anywhere with any collection of fonts on your hard drive.

That brings us to the main feature of Corel Font Manager. Corel has set us free from installed fonts in Windows. You can now use Font Manager to index and install any font from any folder on your hard drive. Corel Font Manager is a stand-alone program like CorelCapture or PowerTrace that interacts with CorelDraw and Photo-Paint. This eliminates the issue of slowing down system performance because too many fonts are installed in the Windows fonts folder. You can now collect as many fonts as you want and activate them when you need them quickly and easily from anywhere on your hard drive.

-Jim Sadler

Jim Sadler

Jim Sadler is a former university professor of computer graphics and a freelance designer. He is currently offering his services as a consultant within the industry. He brings together his expertise in design, computer graphics and industry-related technologies with his ability to communicate through teaching and technical assistance. Jim can be reached by e-mail at [email protected] His web address is www.jsadlerdesign.com.

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