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Laser Settings Needed to Mark Metal Using LaserBond 100

Different metals require different settings

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There are hard metals like nickel, chrome, steel, and various stainless-steel alloys as well as softer metals like aluminum, brass, copper, silver, and gold that can be marked using LaserBond 100. All metals should be marked in focus and at about 500 DPI/PPI.

The harder metals can withstand the thermal shock of the rapid temperature change during the laser bonding process and do not conduct or absorb the heat as quickly as the softer metals; so as a general rule: 100% of laser power can be used up to 100 watts and the laser speed should be adjusted to a percent of total speed that is equal to the actual laser power being used. For example:

  • A 50-watt laser should use 50% speed as a starting point
  • A 30-watt laser should use 30% speed
  • A 60-watt laser should use 60% speed

The softer metals such as aluminum can also withstand the thermal shock of the rapid temperature change during the laser bonding process, but they conduct or absorb the heat very quickly, so high power and slower speeds must be used. As a general rule: up to 100 watts of laser power can be used and the laser speed should be adjusted to a percent that is equal to about 30% of the actual laser power being used. For example:

  • A 50-watt laser should use 15% speed as a starting point
  • A 30-watt laser should use about 10% speed
  • A 60-watt laser should use about 20% speed

Paul Harrison

As the founder of TherMark and inventor of its laser bonding technology, Paul Harrison has more than 25 years of experience in laser marking. More recently, Harrison founded Laser Bonding Technology and invented its nanoparticle materials and laser methods.  

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