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Artwork Adjustments for Sandcarvers

Have you ever had that one design that didn't sandcarve well? This might be a case where the artwork needs to be adjusted or even modified for the best results. 

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Check out the following example of original versus adjusted artwork. This printed artwork is an element from a wine label and looks great as a printed label.

This particular job required a deep etch for paint-fill application, but some of the lines were too small and thin to hold for a deep etch. Our Custom Mask department adjusted this artwork. You can view adjustments in the two images below.

adjustment
Original artwork

Original Artwork

There are thin lines in the crest. The birds have several little lines in the body, which are barely visible in the photomask and will not look good etched.

adjustment
Adjusted artwork

Adjusted Artwork

Our graphic artist adjusted the artwork by adding a stroke to the thin lines and removing some of the detail. They also made the birds into silhouettes, making the bird shape much more visible in the etching. This adjustment allowed for a deeper etch in all the detailed areas and provided the resolution that the design needed for the etching.

Both designs were sandcarved with aluminum oxide 150 grit at 40 psi. Typically, production etchers sandcarve at much higher psi to move through the etching quicker. You can see the difference in the etching. One design appears sharper and provides a resolution similar to the printed label.

Original Artwork Sandcarved

The birds are not visible. The details in the lines do not show up well when etched.

adjustment
Original artwork sandcarved

Adjusted Artwork Sandcarved

Here the birds are visible and actually stand out. There is definition between the lines, allowing the crest to etch deep.

adjustment
Adjusted artwork sandcarved
Liz Haas

Liz Haas

Liz Haas has been a teacher, trainer and show coordinator for Rayzist Photomask for the past 15 years. For the past 10 years, she has actively taught workshops on the photoresist and the sandcarving process.

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